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In the US you may be required to have a USDA license. In the past, all breeders of sugar gliders were required to be licensed, however, changes in the laws now state that you do not need a license if you have 3 or few breeding females.

New USDA Laws
Due to changes in the USDA law, you can now have 3 or fewer breeding female animals. Breeding females are defined as intact females, it doesn't matter if they all breed or not. If you have 3 intact female gliders and an intact female cat, dog, guinea pig, hedgehog, etc. you are still required to get a license. There are many reasons why the USDA has laws regulating sugar gliders. They want to be sure that all animals are well maintained, and that the breeder is following good husbandry. They also want to ensure animals designated as endangered or protected in their country of origin, are not illegally imported into the USA for sales as pets. Also, they want to be sure that the animals being kept do not pose a threat to native flora, fauna or a health threat to the community should they should escape into the wild.

"Requirements and Application--Exemptions From Licensing

Many commenters addressed the proposed amendments to Sec. 2.1(a)(3)(iii) and (iv), which concern exemptions from licensing requirements. In Sec. 2.1, proposed paragraph (a)(3)(iii) exempts from licensing any person who maintains a total of three or fewer breeding female dogs, cats, and/or small exotic or wild mammals, such as hedgehogs, degus, spiny mice, prairie dogs, flying squirrels, and jerboas, and who sells only the offspring of these dogs, cats, or small exotic or wild mammals, which were born and raised on his or her premises, for pets or exhibition, and is not otherwise required to obtain a license."


 

"Sec. 2.1 Requirements and application.

(a) * * *
(3) * * *

(iii) Any person who maintains a total of three (3) or fewer breeding female dogs, cats, and/or small exotic or wild mammals, such as hedgehogs, degus, spiny mice, prairie dogs, flying squirrels, and jerboas, and who sells only the offspring of these dogs, cats, or small exotic or wild mammals, which were born and raised on his or her premises, for pets or exhibition, and is not otherwise required to obtain a license. This exemption does not extend to any person residing in a household that collectively maintains a total of more than three breeding female dogs, cats, and/or small exotic or wild mammals, regardless of ownership, nor to any person maintaining breeding female dogs, cats, and/or small exotic or wild mammals on premises on which more than three breeding female dogs, cats, and/or small exotic or wild mammals are maintained, nor to any person acting in concert with others where they collectively maintain a total of more than three breeding female dogs, cats, and/or small exotic or wild mammals regardless of ownership;"


Find out more about this new law here.

*If your USDA inspector says you don't need a license to breed...and you feel you should under the new law...ask for them to put it in writing...this will protect you and your animals should anything come up.
 


Getting Your USDA License

  • First, you will need to contact your local regional office, or fill out their online request form on the website to receive the packet. Generally the packet will take about one to two weeks to arrive, if you do not receive your packet within that time frame, give them a call to ensure that your request was processed.
  • Now that you have your packet, review the enclosed material and directions. Feel free to contact your local office should you have any questions about forms, or the contents of your packet.
  • Next you will need to fill our your request for license form, APHIS Form 7003-A. You will also need to decide which license you are going to be applying for.
      There are three types of licenses:
      • Class "A": This license allows you to sell animals you have raised at your facility.
      • Class "B": This license allows you to broker, or sell animals raised by another individual.
      • Class "C": This is strictly an exhibitor's license.
  • Mail your form to your local regional office, along with the filing fee. Never send cash in the mail.
  • Next, call your a veterinarian to set up a date that he or she can come out to fill out your Program of Veterinary Care, APHIS Form 7002. The veterinarian must come to your establishment. Each vet is different, but most vets will check the housing conditions of your animals. They may also take a look at your animals to ensure that they are visibly in good health. Generally they will also sit down to discuss things such as diet, emergency care, and any other issues the vet may have. Your Program of Veterinary Care must be completed before the inspector comes to your establishment.
  • Begin to get together your paperwork, as a USDA licensed establishment, you are expected to keep detailed records of the animals have on hand, APHIS Form 7019, and on the acquisition or disposition of any animals APHIS Form 7020. Make sure you have these filled in before the USDA inspector arrives.
  • Now you have your Program of Veterinary Care completed, and your application mailed, and all your paperwork in line. If you haven't already heard from the USDA, now is a good time to follow-up. Around this time, they will set a date for your USDA inspector to visit your establishment. Be prepared! Every inspector and region is different.
  • After your inspection is complete, and you pass, the inspector will give your a customer ID number, this is not your certificate number. You will receive your certificate in about 2-3 weeks after your inspection through the mail. You can not sell Sugar Gliders until receive your certificate and your license number.
     
 

Find out if your breeder or pet store has a USDA license:

USDA License List A
USDA License List B
USDA License List C

~Pet Sugar Gliders~

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